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Queries

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Queries

Postby Philip Daniel » 26 Aug 2004, 23:26

Here is a place to post all your queries (questions) about music theory--harmony, voice leading, counterpoint, the greek modes, key relationships, orchestration, & jazz theory--in hopes to have them answered. Enjoy, and use wisely :wink:.
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Postby Debussy » 27 Aug 2004, 00:00

I just have a minor question since I'll probably be doing this type of exam next year.

What is counterpoint? Please explain.

Thank you. :)
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Postby Philip Daniel » 27 Aug 2004, 01:08

Counterpoint is the science of music. It is a musical device where two or more melodic phrases occur simultaneously. The term comes from the Latin punctus contra punctum (note against note). A note moves against another note when the interval between those two notes either grows or shrinks. By definition, chords occur when multiple notes sound simultaneously; however, this effect is considered incidental. Counterpoint focuses on melodic interaction rather than harmonic effect. The composers Palestrina, Johann Sebastian Bach, & Georg Frideric Handel frequently wrote music using counterpoint.

Generally, such music created from the Baroque period on is described as counterpoint, while music created prior to Baroque times is called polyphony. Hence, the composer Heinrich Isaac wrote polyphonic music.

The fugue offers perhaps the most complex contrapuntal convention used today in music. Other examples include the canon and ricercar.

Counterpoint is one of the most essential means, in musical composition, for the generation of musical ironies; a melodic fragment, heard alone, may make a particular impression, but when heard simultaneously with other melodic ideas, or combined in unexpected ways with itself, as in canon or fugue, surprising new facets of meaning are revealed. This is a means for bringing about development of a musical idea, revealing it to the listener as conceptually more profound than a merely pleasing melody.
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Postby Comme_le_Vent » 27 Aug 2004, 01:10

what is more important, emotion or form?
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Postby Philip Daniel » 27 Aug 2004, 01:11

Comme_le_Vent wrote:what is more important, emotion or form?

Form, when inspired, can stimulate emotional expression, as in the works of Bach, Mozart, & Cherubini. Take their works as your examples, for they are among the best :wink:.
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Postby Comme_le_Vent » 27 Aug 2004, 01:13

but still, which is more important?

have you read saint-sains' opinion obout this?
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Postby Philip Daniel » 27 Aug 2004, 01:14

Comme_le_Vent wrote:but still, which is more important?

have you read saint-sains' opinion obout this?

I don't believe I have; could you enlighten me :)?
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Postby Comme_le_Vent » 27 Aug 2004, 01:19

http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/notes/67331.html

well he doesnt say about form... but he says this interesting thing -

'Art is intended to create beauty and character. Feeling only comes afterwards, and art can very well do without it. In fact it is very much better off when it does'
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Postby Philip Daniel » 27 Aug 2004, 01:21

Comme_le_Vent wrote:http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/notes/67331.html

well he doesnt say about form... but he says this interesting thing -

'Art is intended to create beauty and character. Feeling only comes afterwards, and art can very well do without it. In fact it is very much better off when it does'

I have mixed feelings about that statement--in certain circumstances it has truth, but I still feel somewhat uneasy about it :?. I agree, though, that music must contain fundamental beauty and perfection.
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Postby Comme_le_Vent » 27 Aug 2004, 02:00

perfection is imprefection is it not?

8)
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Postby Philip Daniel » 30 Aug 2004, 12:40

Comme_le_Vent wrote:perfection is imprefection is it not?

8)

In certain cases, yes.
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etc & rhythmic development

Postby midlope » 10 Jan 2006, 01:40

"beauty and character" are to a high extent dependent of feeling. If one wished to depart from feeling, a better statement would have dealt with structure and content; although a brief reading of the Pythagoreans, Plato, or Da Vinci would show even some of the most stringent and deep structures can have emotional, even religious connotations.



My studies have mostly been harmonic, especially since my focus is on ancient, ethnic, and microtonal (just intonational) musics--while I feel as if I've some degree of awareness on their uses, I'm not so sure about rhythmic organizations. I've read fairly often mentionings of "rhythmic development" & although I can fathom what is hinted at, I would like to delve deeper into the subject--one that I feel is necessary to my growth & solidification as a composer. Any resources, examples, etc. would be greatly appreciated.
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