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Chopin's Revolutionary Etude- HELP!!

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Chopin's Revolutionary Etude- HELP!!

Postby tony on Tue Oct 17, 2006 4:21 am

OK, i have been working on this piece ofr like TWO years.. help...the left hand is so hard...i cant seem to make anything work in this piece... especially the mid-section with the whole ascending business... like I said HELP!!





THANKS

tony
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Postby Jeliness2 on Tue Oct 17, 2006 8:54 pm

Maybe, take a break from the piece and learn some classical piece sonatas and bach to increase your technique and then come back. Then, you will already have the technique to play the etude instead of trying to work against the etude. This can lead to bad habits when you don't build a complete foundation.

blah, what do i know... you don't really have to listen to this if you don't want to... It's just what I would do
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Postby elvenpianist on Tue Oct 17, 2006 9:02 pm

Wow, 2 years of work? Do you really think the revolutionary etude is worth that? :P

I definitely would take a break from it. Learn some Bach inventions with tricky left hand finger work, then when you've mastered a few of those go back to your etude. Should go better then.

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Postby juufa72 on Wed Oct 18, 2006 12:02 am

I tried to play his nocturne 9/1 once before. I could not see any improvements for two months. So I decided to stop playing it all together. Perhaps you are taking too much too soon. I suggest that you play "easier" pieces and easy etudes for the left hand alone. Then maybe in a year or two come back to the Revolutionary.
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Postby PJF on Fri Oct 20, 2006 5:11 am

I agree with the juuf. A couple of years ago, I was trying very hard (and mostly failing...mostly) to learn Chopin's Winter Wind Etude 25/11. In disgust, I abruptly quit playing it. Six months and four easier Chopin Etudes later, I began work again on the 25/11. I mastered it in a month.

Try this. Make sure you memorize the piece @ a tempo slow enough to let you play the correct notes; take it as slow as is needed to get accuracy.
Tempo does not mean anything at this point!!!!!

After a couple weeks of ultra-slow, ULTRA-ACCURATE practice, drop the piece completely for at least three weeks and for as long as a year.

When you return to the piece, treat it very carefully, like wet paint. You will need to do whatever is necessary to neatly cure this musical 'painting' into a firmly fixed, framed and finished product.

I know this is rather generic advice. If you have a specific problem, e-mail me.


p.s. Just remember, if after two years you haven't made significant weekly progress, you're doing something wrong. If you can figure that out, you're
more than halfway there.
Per Sapientiam Felicitas!

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Postby gawbark on Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:39 pm

I would like to give you some advice about the Revolutionary Etude, but I would need to know what standard of playing you are at. You obviously love the piece if you are willing to spend two years on it. This very long time suggests that the piece was way beyond you when you started. What is the position now?

John :D
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Postby tony on Tue Mar 06, 2007 4:36 am

Well, the position now is MUCH better. I have used the Etude as an audition piece countless times. My teachers think it's at it's best at this point. It just really takes constant slow-practice, and constant reviewing. I have learned that with the Chopin Etudes you can't miss a day of practice for it too sound any better the next day. Also, with each day of progression in one manner, another difficult obstacle arises...unfortunate of course. :?
Piano- partially a noteworthy feat, constantly a struggle.

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Postby PJF on Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:09 am

Let's hear it. mediafire.com is a free host to all media.

Pete
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