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Concerto Competition

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Which concerto movement do you prefer?

Beethoven - PC no.1 Op. 15 in C Major, Mve. 1
4
66%
Mozart- PC no. 9 K.271 in E-flat Major, Mve. 1
2
33%
 
Total votes : 6

Concerto Competition

Postby Jeliness2 on Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:13 pm

Hi everyone.

Next year I was thinking of competing in a concerto competition, where the winner plays with the Eastern Connecticut Symphony Youth Orchestra. The required repertoire is a movement from a concerto for standard symphony orchestra.

My teacher gave me two suggestions:

Beethoven's Piano Concerto no.1 in C Major, Op. 15, Mve. 1
or
Mozart's Piano Concerto no.9 in E-flat Major, K.271, "Jeunehomme", Mve. 1


Which do you prefer?

Thanks
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Postby lol_nl on Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:02 pm

I like the Mozart.

I heard the Beethoven a few times, but somehow I can't remember it well. Probably it didn't have a big influence on me.

So I like the Mozart more.
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Postby tony on Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:07 pm

lol, Jelliness, I was thinking of competing in the New Jersey symphony Orchestra competion too! I started working on the Grieg Concerto it's fun and interesting. I'm working on it by myself though.The winner gets a cash prize, and perfoms with the NJSO. I think you should do the Beethoven. However, choose what you like best. Maybe ask your teacher for another Concerto you might be more familiar with. :)

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Postby PianistSk8er on Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:56 pm

That piano concerto by Mozart is quite nice; then again, so is the one by Beethoven. I would definitely listen to some recordings of each, if I were you, and decide therefrom. I'm sure you'll play your chosen piece best if it is a piece that you enjoy to learn, to practice, to perform, etc.

Good luck! ;)
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Postby Jeliness2 on Wed Jun 07, 2006 1:50 am

Hey thanks you guys,

After listening to both with a score... I think I like the Beethoven more... Although it's a bit harder technique-wise. And it's also 17 minutes, whereas the Mozart is about 10.
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Postby Goldberg on Wed Jun 07, 2006 5:07 am

In my opinion, the Beethoven is definitely the superior work and since you have about a year to work on it, I think you should take on the challenge and master it to as high a level as possible--the payoffs will be higher than what you'll find in the Mozart, even in terms of how the jury responds to the performance (comparing two equally good performances of both the Mozart and Beethoven), at least in my mind. The first and second Beethoven concerti have always been personal favorites of mine, though, but I don't think that has factored into my opinion here.
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Postby Chozart on Wed Jun 07, 2006 4:40 pm

Randomly there's a similar competition here too ~ plays with St. Paul Chamber Orch I believe
Called "Minnesota Idol" lol

Anyway, I'd say the Mozart
I've just heard the Beethoven so much I'm like "eh" on it (not to say it's not a great work though, I'm just a bit tired of it right now)

I know it's not really any reason for you but yeah... blah
both are great, and good luck!
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Postby tony on Sun Jun 11, 2006 1:19 am

Jelli, what things are you going to do to lean the concerto? how are going to learn it? What special things are going to work on in it? What tecnique will you use? Just wondeing some of these things..

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Postby Jeliness2 on Sun Jun 11, 2006 4:15 am

hmmm, I've never really learnt a concerto before... (wait is learnt a word?... I don't know; it's really late and I'm tired.) I'll probably learn my parts similar to a sonata, but additionally, I'll listen to a lot of recordings and try to learn how to syncronize with an orchestra...

This means I'll probably be working on my counting... and on learning how to play scales in a specific timeframe, so I don't completely end at the wrong time. haha

Also, I have never learned a piece this long that is just a single movement, so I'm going to be working on memorization techniques. I'll be paying more attention to phrasing and shape.
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Postby tony on Sun Jun 11, 2006 7:41 pm

oh cool. The competition I want to enter requires all the movements... so I'll have to work on memorization as well.. :roll:

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Postby tony on Sun Jun 11, 2006 9:23 pm

hey, anyone been in a piano concerto competition? if so, tell us about the experience... so we can learn from it...

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Postby elvenpianist on Sun Jun 11, 2006 11:44 pm

Jeliness2 wrote:(wait is learnt a word?... I don't know; it's really late and I'm tired.)


Verily.
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Postby PJF on Mon Jul 10, 2006 5:44 am

I've never been in a concerto competition but that will change soon enough. I'm working on Chopin's E minor for a 2007 competition and I can tell you I've never been more focused in my practice. Nothing motivates like a REAL deadline with lifelong consequences. I'm scared to death and giddy with anticipation at the same time! :D
Per Sapientiam Felicitas!

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Postby tony on Tue Jul 11, 2006 3:59 am

I know!!!!! Any tips on not getting nearvous and messing up like an idiot during the performance.... that is one of my HUGE fears.. or if i get in.. when i play with the orchestra i mess up loose my place go ahead of the orchestra.......SCREETCH**** ARGHHH! :shock::roll::?

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Postby PJF on Tue Jul 11, 2006 5:34 am

tony wrote:I know!!!!! Any tips on not getting nearvous and messing up like an idiot during the performance.... that is one of my HUGE fears.. or if I get in.. when I play with the orchestra I mess up loose my place go ahead of the orchestra.......SCREETCH**** ARGHHH! :shock::roll::?


First, you must do ALL the work. The key to not getting nervous is to BE PREPARED!

I record myself every day with a video camera. As soon as I turn the camera on, I get an adrenaline response, exactly what I feel on stage.

I try to trigger my stage fright every day. After the thousandth time, I'm simply not bothered by nerves.

Never stop at a mistake during a practice performance, even if that means playing nonsense for a few bars. Also, make sure you engage your mind, by that I mean, see the music in your mind's eye. Lastly, audiate as clearly as possible. In your mind, you must first hear EXACTLY what you want to play, then make sure you play EXACTLY what you hear in your head. This is not an easy task, but if done correctly, you will have the most secure performance possible.

Also, immediately before a recital, try to convince yourself that you don't care about messing up. The stage is NOT the place to worry about something you couldn't possibly fix. If your pieces have flaws, realize that you probably will have a few slips. That's O.K.!

If you need proof of this, listen to this recording of Vladimir Horowitz. Not two seconds into the first piece he screws up royally. In spite of his errors he gives a phenomenal performance.

http://star.walagata.com/w/lapeter/horo ... oncert.wma

Ask yourself. "Which is better, note-perfection with the artistic vision of an assembly line or, an artistic performance despite flaws?" I think you know the answer to that one.

My point is, even the greatest of the great make mistakes. Chopin himself made plenty, as did Mozart, Beethoven and Rachmaninoff. What made them different is that they didn't do note-wise playing. If a piece is played correctly, there is a continuity that makes wrong notes inconsequential.
Per Sapientiam Felicitas!

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