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Pianistic feats

Discussion of legendary pianists, by whom the art of music has been so fantastically developed.
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Pianistic feats

Postby Nocturneguy on Mon Aug 08, 2005 9:42 pm

Here we shall list and discuss pianistic feats...some right off the top of my head:

-Liszt'z octaved Chopin Etude op. 25 no. 2... :shock:
-Dreyschock's octaved Revolutionary etude... :shock:...scary...
-Horowitz's "Octave Race" in American Debut playing Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto 1...it's supposed to have been: :shock:and jaw-dropping...

Sorry all of the feats I listed involve octaves...these are the only ones I know of...shame on me... :cry:

oops, almost forgot...

-Richter's Chopin etude 10/4 recording...
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Postby citrine_peridot on Tue Aug 09, 2005 1:06 am

I thought the octaved 25n2 was Godowsky or Scriabin...it was a year ago when I read it...

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Postby Nocturneguy on Tue Aug 09, 2005 1:12 am

Nope...LISZT! to prove he was better than Dreyschock...
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Postby Fryderyk on Tue Aug 09, 2005 1:21 am

Nocturneguy wrote:Nope...LISZT! to prove he was better than Dreyschock...


Didn´t he do it on the spot, more or less, while Dreyschock practised and prepared for an aweful lot of time?

I would say that many of the storys about Liszt are jaw dropping- true or not :roll:.

Actually I think I should mention Leslie Howard in this thread aswell, for his enormous Liszt-box.

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Postby Nocturneguy on Tue Aug 09, 2005 2:01 am

Yes, he "practiced" it on the spot-only the first measures a couple of times...then he played the whole thing...thats wut i call "wicked"...
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Postby juufa72 on Tue Aug 09, 2005 3:37 am

Nocturneguy wrote:Yes, he "practiced" it on the spot-only the first measures a couple of times...then he played the whole thing...thats wut i call "wicked"...



That's what I call "1 in X" (X being the total number of all humans who have ever lived and those not yet to live.....I was going to say one in a million, but that is not as cool as 1:X :roll::wink:)
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Postby Brewtality on Tue Aug 09, 2005 5:35 am

I like the story of Hofmann hearing Godowsky work out his Fledermaus at the piano (i.e before he had written it down) and then playing it back for him note for note when they saw each other the next week.

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Postby Max on Tue Aug 09, 2005 6:37 am

Fryderyk wrote:Actually I think I should mention Leslie Howard in this thread aswell, for his enormous Liszt-box.


Even thought I don't agree with the playing, I agree.
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Postby Fryderyk on Tue Aug 09, 2005 9:28 pm

Ok, I´ll pick another one:

I´ll give Saint Saens "some" respect for being able to play all of the Beethoven piano sonatas from memory at the age of 10. He was hailed as "the second Mozart" after this, but who wasn´t :roll:.

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Postby Goldberg on Tue Aug 09, 2005 10:20 pm

Alexander Paley playing all of the Liszt Grandes Etudes live in one sitting, and similarly, Francesco Libetta playing all of the Godowsky etudes in a certain period (was it 3 days?).
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Postby Jeliness2 on Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:02 am

Anyone who can do an octave glissando well is worth mentioning ;-)
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Postby Brewtality on Wed Aug 10, 2005 1:40 am

Jeliness2 wrote:Anyone who can do an octave glissando well is worth mentioning ;-)


um, I can do octave gliss and I am definitely NOT worth mentioning. People who can play the octave glissando part as stacatto and pianissimo but as fast as others can play glissando ARE worth mentioning. Like Lhevinne in the Brahms Paganini Variations.

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Postby dnephi on Mon Aug 21, 2006 4:54 pm

I octaved Chopin Revolutionary. Not up to speed, and I am quite annoyed by the fact that I am missing a few notes at the bottom. Hardest part is those insane jumps which are just steep arpeggios in the original.

Absolutely great octave study though.

Any suggestions on a similar piece to octave on right hand?
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Postby avetma on Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:01 pm

Liszt's sightreading whole Grieg concerto from manuscript? :D
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Postby dnephi on Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:35 pm

avetma wrote:Liszt's sightreading whole Grieg concerto from manuscript? :D

More impressive is sightreadying Brahms Concerto (Don't know which one)... but either one is pretty sick. Brahms being much harder.
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