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Chopin's 4 Ballades

Discussion of Chopin's life and works, only.
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Your favorite?

Ballade No. 1, Op. 23 in G Minor
26
49%
Ballade No. 2, Op. 38 in F Major
2
3%
Ballade No. 3, Op. 47 in A-Flat Major
6
11%
Ballade No. 4, Op. 52 in F Minor
19
35%
 
Total votes : 53

Postby Mephisto on Wed Apr 13, 2005 8:59 pm

My favourite is no2. The ending is really beutifull.
I love all of them but there is really something spesial about no2.

-The Mephisto

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Postby Max on Wed Apr 13, 2005 9:18 pm

There is something even more special about your avatar.
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Postby Mephisto on Thu Apr 14, 2005 12:35 pm

Yes it is.
I hope this is not out of topic and is ruining this forum or something like that. But my avatar( Adriana Lima) is certainly one of the most beutifull women on this planet.

-The Mephisto

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Postby Amnesia on Thu May 05, 2005 9:02 pm

Well, I have been working on his Ballade No.1 one for months now and I have got a good portion of the piece down. I've conquered the Presto Con Fuoco (at least the first half anyway) and I can play everything up until the animato section, which the exception of one or two technical difficulties which still need some work... but now I seemed to have reached a dead end.

It seems like I've been working on this piece now for so long that my dedication and motivation to keep learning it are diminishing rapidly. And tips on how to get through? I have this horrible habit where I start learning a piece and then put it aside before I have the chance to finish it. It's very irritating.. about 90% of what I can play consists of unfinished pieces.

I really love this ballade though and I have worked hard to accomplish what I have so far. Does anyone have any learning strategies that help accelerate the process?
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Postby Fryderyk on Thu May 05, 2005 10:15 pm

Take a break and then attack again. Unfortunately, piano playing is not only music and passion, it's also long, boring work.

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Postby Amnesia on Thu May 05, 2005 10:34 pm

That's certainly true. I guess it's all that work and practice you put into piano-playing that makes the end result so rewarding and gratifying.
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Postby Max on Fri May 06, 2005 3:09 pm

It's not all boring though, heh - when I get bored of 'studying a piece' I play through pieces like the Rach 2 (without the intent of learning it), it's very refreshing.
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Postby Nocturneguy on Fri Jul 08, 2005 3:28 am

Fryderyk, I love ur avatar...It's hard to see, but I can tell two of the pianists are Cortot (THE PIANO INTERPRETATION GOD!) and Godowsky. The other two I am guessing it's Paderewski and Prokofiev?
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Postby b3n on Fri Jul 22, 2005 7:44 am

I like n1 & 4 the best but n4 just a tiny bit better, so it gets the vote.
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Postby Fryderyk on Fri Jul 22, 2005 9:17 am

Nocturneguy wrote:Fryderyk, I love ur avatar...It's hard to see, but I can tell two of the pianists are Cortot (THE PIANO INTERPRETATION GOD!) and Godowsky. The other two I am guessing it's Paderewski and Prokofiev?


Yes, thank you, it´s a very nice picture- like so many others of Cortot. I´ve had a several other Cortot-pictures as my avatar before.

The musicians on the picture are Jacques Thibaud, Gabriel Fauré, Alfred Cortot and Pablo Casals. It´s very hard so see, I´m amazed that you saw Cortot at all, perhaps I´m the only one around with bad eyes =).

http://www2.inow.com/~starr/Photos/faure.jpg

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to pianistsk8er

Postby Fryderyk Biggemski on Tue Nov 08, 2005 9:50 pm

"I've played this piece many times and, most likely, the part of the piece with which I've had the greatest difficulty begins on page 5 (7/10), leads through the octaves jeff(8/10), gets to piu animato (8/10), then to animato (9.5/10) and then finishes leading on (8/10) to the F# minor chord. Try playing that without a single mistake and your technique will be the largest of my envies! "


haha, without mistake? no problem but in whut tempo? :lol:
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Personal/Historical Reflections on Ballade in G Minor Opus23

Postby RonPrice on Thu Feb 16, 2006 5:03 am

CREATING A NARRATIVE MOOD

Chopin(1810-1849) composed in obedience to inner promptings, dictated by his own musical instincts, tastes, feelings and predispositions. His first composition was in 1817, the year of the birth of the Founder of the Baha’i Faith. Chopin infused new ideas into known forms. The Ballade, for example, which had formerly been a vocalized poem, he cast into an instrumental mold. This afternoon, February 15th 2006, I have been listening to Chopin’s Ballade in G Minor Op. 23. Its opening phrase creates a narrative mood, a mood which is forever changing and a mood which the Polish-born pianist Arthur Rubenstein defined as epic grandiosity in 1959. (1)

Written at some time in the years 1831 to 1835, this Ballade may have had its origins in a particular aspect of the world of the spirit. For where does a melody and music come from to/in the mind of a genius like Chopin? Perhaps Chopin was moved by elements in a musical ether at the time he fell in love with the 17 year old Maria and as his star of celebrity was rising in the early 1830s. Perhaps some virtue of a grace was exercising an influence on his soul as an approaching narrative was to be played on the stage of Iran’s religious history. One can hypothesize endlessly or not at all as the case may be.

The episode of the narrative I am thinking of was one in which Siyyid Kazim met the Bab in Karbila and in a chamber bedecked by flowers and redolent of the loveliest perfume. The Bab gave him a pure beveridge which Siyyid Kazim, we are told, drank from a silver cup.2 The last stages of the preface to the narrative of Babi and Baha’i history was being enacted. –Ron Price with thanks to 1“Internet Sites on Chopin and Chopin’s Ballades,” Pioneering Over Four Epochs, February 15th 2006; and 2Muhammad-i-Zarandi, Nabil’s Narrative, Baha’i Publishing Trust, Wilmette, 1974(1932), p.26.

This narrative mood set upon me
for many a year in obedience to
inner promptings, dictated by
my literary and experiential
instincts, tastes, feelings and
predispositions as they changed
and flowed with an epic grandiosity
as if Arthur Rubenstein himself had
set the stage back in ’59 when some(1)
mysterious dispensation of a watchful
Providence scattered abroad fragrances
uttered elsewhere and exercised some
influence on my soul as I played
baseball, hockey and football,
studied grade ten subjects and
fell in love with Susan Gregory
and half a dozen other girls.

1 Arthur Rubenstein was the first to record Chopin in stereo in 1959. He interpreted Chopin in the context of an epic grandiosity so writes Mark Jordan in “Burkard Schliessmann- Chopin: Ballades,” High Fidelity Review.com.

Ron Price
February 15th 2006. :idea:
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Postby nathf on Thu Jun 22, 2006 2:43 pm

I think the first has the most memorable theme/s, and they were all (the ballades) great accomplishments. But the last, in my opinion is truly the masterpiece of the four. It just has so much depth. The first time you listen to it, a lot of the harmonies are just too complex to comprehend or expect (especially in the end sections) but all sound so beautiful and correct (not too chaotic).
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