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etude op10 no1 WATER FALL

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etude op10 no1 WATER FALL

Postby johnmar78 on Fri Jun 30, 2006 3:37 am

hi there,

I have started this 9 months ago and it took me around 5 minutes to complete playing. at the time my hands was not up to scratch for this particular piece.

I do only 3 hours a week approx. on my especially weighted modifiend C3.
After 3 months the time dropped to 3.30 minutes.
Now days it took me around 2.15 to complete. If I push it, and starts to loose clarity and the closet was 2.05. I know the previous russian pianest who won the sceond last international piano comp he did 1.53. So as Murray Peria(spelt wrong). Some did around 2.2 to 2.10 mark.

I just be intertested if any one played this etude op10no 1 in c major.
And whats the approx time did you guys get. I want to to a reasearch on times.

Ps. My time is quoted played from memory(2.15) as always.

thanks
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cracky, where is every one on ops 10 no 1??

Postby johnmar78 on Fri Jul 07, 2006 4:06 am

It has been a week or too.. someone must be out there and did this study. op10 no1 in c major??

Come on GUYS.....
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Postby PJF on Sat Jul 08, 2006 9:00 am

Hello there, johnmar, Pete here. I am an aspiring concert artist, I'm SO CLOSE! I have mastered about half the Chopin Etudes, op10 Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 12 and op25 Nos. 1, 2, 9, 11 and 12. I'm currently working on his Concerto #1 in e minor, to be played in 2007 at a major competion. I'm not a kid anymore, so if I'm gonna have a career in performing, it's now or never, THE PRESSURE IS ON!!!

What follows is a personal story.

The Virtuosic Hack

I started piano lessons fairly late, at the age of 14. I skipped the standard beginning and went right to standard classical literature. I just dove headlong into it. The first piece I ever played was the first mvmt of Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata". The second piece I learned was a Chopin Mazurka. My teacher didn't handle my unorthodox ways very well. I was never taught discipline. Fast forward 7 years.

I'd been playing piano for nearly 8 years, now. Up until that time, I was a decent if not too serious pianist. I played the likes of Chopin's "Raindrop Prelude" (#15 in Db Major) Beethoven's Pathetique Sonata (the first movement badly, the third mvmt adequately and the second mvmt , as my teacher put it, "astonishingly beautifully".) My musical instinct was superlative, my technique was, to put it bluntly, crappy. I played 10 Chopin Preludes but didn't know any scales or theory! I pushed the horse with the cart. I continued at this level until...


The Awakening
September 11, 2001


The events of that day ignited a fire in my soul that still burns white hot.
I can't explain how, but I realized all at once what my task was. I would share the burden of everyone's greif through musical utterance. I felt a compelling sense of duty and a clarity of purpose that defies description. I've never looked back. The dilletante was dead.


Opus 10 No.1
May 12, 2002


I was my only teacher. The first time I sat down and did a cold reading @1/4 tempo (or less), I was astonished at the intervals between fourth an fifth fingers and the apparent impossibility of ever attaining a tempo of 176?!?!?! It seemed more likely for me to sprout wings and buzz around like a bee than to play it at full tempo, or even half speed! I didn't give up. I'd never concentrated so much in all my life. The piece became an obsession, I suffered (and thankfully recovered from) a mental breakdown. My stubburness soon paid dividends.

SUCCESS!
March 13, 2004


One morning, the music flowed naturally. First @120 then 144 then 156, 160....176!!! I had done it, AND captured the moment on video!!! I started work on other etudes, they came much easier. My family and friends took notice, the neighbors called asking who I had over that could play so well, I became a totally different pianist. I had sucessfully fused my innate musicality with my new found physical and mental power. I had broken through.

My personal record time (with exactly two note errors) is 1:51. I captured this moment on tape, too! That's not to say it is my favorite performance, no! My favorite personal recording is 2:00 [email protected] with ten note errors, (technically less but artistically so much more!)

Please, do not be impressed, for God's sake. I worked on this one piece for what I estimate to be nearly 1,000 hours. An ungodly waste of time for most people with lives outside the practice room, but I don't fit what most consider to be the social norm. That amount of work, for most, is insane. Maybe I'm a little crazy, c'est la vie!


I'd love to share thoughts about the opus10 #1, or any other piece as well. Two heads are better than one. I'm sure each of us could gain insight from the other. I hope to hear from you!
Per Sapientiam Felicitas!

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Postby lol_nl on Sat Jul 08, 2006 11:05 am

PJF wrote:Hello there, johnmar, Pete here. I am an aspiring concert artist, I'm SO CLOSE! I have mastered about half the Chopin Etudes, op10 Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 12 and op25 Nos. 1, 2, 9, 11 and 12. I'm currently working on his Concerto #1 in e minor, to be played in 2007 at a major competion. I'm not a kid anymore, so if I'm gonna have a career in performing, it's now or never, THE PRESSURE IS ON!!!

What follows is a personal story.

The Virtuosic Hack

I started piano lessons fairly late, at the age of 14. I skipped the standard beginning and went right to standard classical literature. I just dove headlong into it. The first piece I ever played was the first mvmt of Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata". The second piece I learned was a Chopin Mazurka. My teacher didn't handle my unorthodox ways very well. I was never taught discipline. Fast forward 7 years.

I'd been playing piano for nearly 8 years, now. Up until that time, I was a decent if not too serious pianist. I played the likes of Chopin's "Raindrop Prelude" (#15 in Db Major) Beethoven's Pathetique Sonata (the first movement badly, the third mvmt adequately and the second mvmt , as my teacher put it, "astonishingly beautifully".) My musical instinct was superlative, my technique was, to put it bluntly, crappy. I played 10 Chopin Preludes but didn't know any scales or theory! I pushed the horse with the cart. I continued at this level until...


The Awakening
September 11, 2001


The events of that day ignited a fire in my soul that still burns white hot.
I can't explain how, but I realized all at once what my task was. I would share the burden of everyone's greif through musical utterance. I felt a compelling sense of duty and a clarity of purpose that defies description. I've never looked back. The dilletante was dead.


Opus 10 No.1
May 12, 2002


I was my only teacher. The first time I sat down and did a cold reading @1/4 tempo (or less), I was astonished at the intervals between fourth an fifth fingers and the apparent impossibility of ever attaining a tempo of 176?!?!?! It seemed more likely for me to sprout wings and buzz around like a bee than to play it at full tempo, or even half speed! I didn't give up. I'd never concentrated so much in all my life. The piece became an obsession, I suffered (and thankfully recovered from) a mental breakdown. My stubburness soon paid dividends.

SUCCESS!
March 13, 2004


One morning, the music flowed naturally. First @120 then 144 then 156, 160....176!!! I had done it, AND captured the moment on video!!! I started work on other etudes, they came much easier. My family and friends took notice, the neighbors called asking who I had over that could play so well, I became a totally different pianist. I had sucessfully fused my innate musicality with my new found physical and mental power. I had broken through.

My personal record time (with exactly two note errors) is 1:51. I captured this moment on tape, too! That's not to say it is my favorite performance, no! My favorite personal recording is 2:00 [email protected] with ten note errors, (technically less but artistically so much more!)

Please, do not be impressed, for God's sake. I worked on this one piece for what I estimate to be nearly 1,000 hours. An ungodly waste of time for most people with lives outside the practice room, but I don't fit what most consider to be the social norm. That amount of work, for most, is insane. Maybe I'm a little crazy, c'est la vie!


I'd love to share thoughts about the opus10 #1, or any other piece as well. Two heads are better than one. I'm sure each of us could gain insight from the other. I hope to hear from you!


Hi Pete,

First of all, welcome to the forums. For if you haven't noticed yet, there is a welcome lougne where you can introduce yourself.

That was a very interesting story. I have respect for your perseverance, and how you kept working on it. It seems so hard for me to keep working on a piece for such a long time, I really would mentally break down when I would work like you. And when I mentally break down, I don't practise at all, instead of working myself crazy.

So how are you doing now? Are you studying at a conservatory or with any good teacher, or still just on your own? You want to be a concert pianist, right? You have gained enough confidence, when I read what you've written in the first lines. The pressure must be tremendous, as you want it so much and are so close to it.

I like your stories. I would like to hear more, because they really give me inspiration and confidence, which I've always lacked. Thanks for the post!
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Postby PJF on Sun Jul 09, 2006 5:46 am

lol_nl wrote:
PJF wrote:Hello there, johnmar, Pete here. I am an aspiring concert artist, I'm SO CLOSE! I have mastered about half the Chopin Etudes, op10 Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 12 and op25 Nos. 1, 2, 9, 11 and 12. I'm currently working on his Concerto #1 in e minor, to be played in 2007 at a major competion. I'm not a kid anymore, so if I'm gonna have a career in performing, it's now or never, THE PRESSURE IS ON!!!

What follows is a personal story.

The Virtuosic Hack

I started piano lessons fairly late, at the age of 14. I skipped the standard beginning and went right to standard classical literature. I just dove headlong into it. The first piece I ever played was the first mvmt of Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata". The second piece I learned was a Chopin Mazurka. My teacher didn't handle my unorthodox ways very well. I was never taught discipline. Fast forward 7 years.

I'd been playing piano for nearly 8 years, now. Up until that time, I was a decent if not too serious pianist. I played the likes of Chopin's "Raindrop Prelude" (#15 in Db Major) Beethoven's Pathetique Sonata (the first movement badly, the third mvmt adequately and the second mvmt , as my teacher put it, "astonishingly beautifully".) My musical instinct was superlative, my technique was, to put it bluntly, crappy. I played 10 Chopin Preludes but didn't know any scales or theory! I pushed the horse with the cart. I continued at this level until...


The Awakening
September 11, 2001


The events of that day ignited a fire in my soul that still burns white hot.
I can't explain how, but I realized all at once what my task was. I would share the burden of everyone's greif through musical utterance. I felt a compelling sense of duty and a clarity of purpose that defies description. I've never looked back. The dilletante was dead.


Opus 10 No.1
May 12, 2002


I was my only teacher. The first time I sat down and did a cold reading @1/4 tempo (or less), I was astonished at the intervals between fourth an fifth fingers and the apparent impossibility of ever attaining a tempo of 176?!?!?! It seemed more likely for me to sprout wings and buzz around like a bee than to play it at full tempo, or even half speed! I didn't give up. I'd never concentrated so much in all my life. The piece became an obsession, I suffered (and thankfully recovered from) a mental breakdown. My stubburness soon paid dividends.

SUCCESS!
March 13, 2004


One morning, the music flowed naturally. First @120 then 144 then 156, 160....176!!! I had done it, AND captured the moment on video!!! I started work on other etudes, they came much easier. My family and friends took notice, the neighbors called asking who I had over that could play so well, I became a totally different pianist. I had sucessfully fused my innate musicality with my new found physical and mental power. I had broken through.

My personal record time (with exactly two note errors) is 1:51. I captured this moment on tape, too! That's not to say it is my favorite performance, no! My favorite personal recording is 2:00 [email protected] with ten note errors, (technically less but artistically so much more!)

Please, do not be impressed, for God's sake. I worked on this one piece for what I estimate to be nearly 1,000 hours. An ungodly waste of time for most people with lives outside the practice room, but I don't fit what most consider to be the social norm. That amount of work, for most, is insane. Maybe I'm a little crazy, c'est la vie!


I'd love to share thoughts about the opus10 #1, or any other piece as well. Two heads are better than one. I'm sure each of us could gain insight from the other. I hope to hear from you!


Hi Pete,

First of all, welcome to the forums. For if you haven't noticed yet, there is a welcome lougne where you can introduce yourself.

That was a very interesting story. I have respect for your perseverance, and how you kept working on it. It seems so hard for me to keep working on a piece for such a long time, I really would mentally break down when I would work like you. And when I mentally break down, I don't practise at all, instead of working myself crazy.

So how are you doing now? Are you studying at a conservatory or with any good teacher, or still just on your own? You want to be a concert pianist, right? You have gained enough confidence, when I read what you've written in the first lines. The pressure must be tremendous, as you want it so much and are so close to it.

I like your stories. I would like to hear more, because they really give me inspiration and confidence, which I've always lacked. Thanks for the post!


Between 1996 and 2004 I was my only teacher. I'm currently pursuing a master's degree in both Piano Pedagogy and Piano Performance at the University. My piano teacher is incredible. She has a way of putting her students at ease, while at the same time demanding excellence.

I credit my improvement to all the books I read. I have over 80 books about piano playing on my bookshelf. I always buy a book instead of getting it from the library. The real value of a book is only realized when you've had a chance to read it many times over the years. When I re-read a book, I always learn something I had previously overlooked.

I learn from watching the masters. An enormous amount of information is conveyed through actually seeing a master at work.

About practice, you are correct in taking a break when your body or mind
is need of rest. I have a set of practice rules I follow.

#1 Always approach the piano with reverance. When I start a practice session, I always stop for a minute to realize that this instrument is capable of producing the most beautiful music. My only task is to set that music free from the cold strings.

#2 Find your center. I do this by meditating on the phrase, "IT CAN BE DONE" I put myself into a trance, my mind is completely focused on the music. It usually takes several years for a pianist to be able to turn the trance on at will. If you have the patience, it will happen.

#3 Never over-practice, it's worse than too little. My rule of thumb is,
if anything is stiff or sore or if I am just plain tired, I take 3 days off in a row. When I resume practice, I feel strong, totally focused and full of good ideas. Nothing is worse than monotony! Monotony is death to spontaneity and spontaneity is the very essence of artistic expression.

#4 Maintain a routine. My monday-saturday routine is 2 hours in the AM with an emphasis on musical expression and 2 hours in the PM with an emphasis on technique and memorization. I split the 2 hours into 3 forty minute sessions with a 20 minute break in between. I usually use the free time to eat or watch tv. Your routine will, of course, be different. Do what works and discard what doesn't.

#5 Always be honest. It may be tempting to take shortcuts, but doing that is the worst thing a pianist can do! Never lose control, the student who does is doomed to failure!

#6 Realize the difficulty. Whenever I hear a bad performance, I know the cause right away. The pianist did not fully appreciate the difficulty of the task at hand. Coordinating all your bones and muscles (your mind and ears too), is quite an undertaking that must not be underestimated!

#7 Own up to your flaws and fix them. Practice what you don't know how to do. Remember, practice's sole purpose is to cause a positive change. Never overlook a flaw, fix it NOW!

8# Just play. Don't always approach the piano with the one goal of practice. Sometimes just have fun, play an improvised song, set yourself free to be musical. Don't care a bit about wrong notes, on this day it doesn't matter, throw caution to the wind. Play a piece you already know, and experiment with different sounds and textures, Glenn Gould was the master of baroque remix. Of course, I wouldn't recommend performing like Gould, only he could pull that off! Enjoy it!

#9 Try to play on more than one piano. Practicing day after day on the same instrument can cause you to devolop subtle habits. When you then give a performance on a different instrument, problems that you hadn't identified show up unexpectedly in the middle of a recital. :oops:

#10 Exercise and eat a proper diet. This is overlooked by so many pianists! How does one expect to play well if the body is out of shape? One can't. Through trial and error, I found the best exercises for me are swimming, cycling, walking and light strength training, heavy bodybuilding is not compatible with piano playing. I also make absolutley sure to eat enough protein, pianists are athletes and need about 50% more protein than non-pianists. Adequate calcium intake is vital. Calcium deficiency will cause stress fractures of the back and neck, resulting in the eventual development of severe arthritis. Exercise is also very good for maintaining bone health.

#11 Once a year, leave the piano completely alone for three weeks. You will avoid chronic fatigue by taking a holiday.

#12 Practice in front of a mirror. You can't correct a technical problem if you can't see it.
Last edited by PJF on Thu Sep 28, 2006 1:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Per Sapientiam Felicitas!

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Postby johnmar78 on Tue Jul 11, 2006 11:05 pm

very nice,
I did a run yesterday, its 2.15 with gravity playing. I am focus on its art rather than speed.
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Postby PJF on Thu Jul 13, 2006 8:36 am

Congratulations! :mrgreen:
Per Sapientiam Felicitas!

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Postby dnephi on Fri Sep 29, 2006 3:53 pm

johnmar78 wrote:very nice,
I did a run yesterday, its 2.15 with gravity playing. I am focus on its art rather than speed.

I play with arm weight, as is (supposedly) universally accepted. Is this what you meant?
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Postby johnmar78 on Mon Apr 02, 2007 2:54 am

[quote="dnephi"][quote="johnmar78"]very nice,
I did a run yesterday, its 2.15 with gravity playing. I am focus on its art rather than speed.[/quote]
I play with arm weight, as is (supposedly) universally accepted. Is this what you meant?[/quote]

arm weight supplies around 40% of the playing(rough estimate) but this requires more burnning of kinetic energy that dnt come around just arm weight. Whole body plus your MUSCLES.....
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Re: etude op10 no1 WATER FALL

Postby pianola on Wed Oct 17, 2007 2:30 am

johnmar78, i just wanna say that u should be very very proud of urself 2 be able to play this piece. it looks easy but its actually one of the hardest etudes in opus 10.
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